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How to spot a good Chinese Restaurant in Vermont (of all places)

LaPlatte Black Angus up closeVermont is celebrated for many remarkable and beautiful things. Unfortunately for the culinary-inquisitor, cultural diversity is nowhere near the top of this list of attributes. Larger cities have developed cultural centers – Little Italy and the ubiquitous China Town. But even as Burlington enjoys a small but steady influx of people and cuisines from around the world, Vermont is still somewhat homogenous, e.g., meat and potatoes.

This makes it difficult to spot a good Chinese restaurant. In New York and Montreal, Chinese foodies and gourmets look for a couple of tell-tale signs: none of the waiters speak English, the diners are all Asian, the menu is written in Chinese. In Vermont, we have to be better sleuths. We have to use our noses to suss out the delectable fragrance of local food.

The abundant and inventive use of local food is part of the reason why A Single Pebble in Burlington was named “The Best Restaurant in Vermont” by Vermont Magazine. For Chef-Owner Chiuho Duval, not only does each dish carry it’s own unique history and story, each ingredient does, too. From the dairy in locally made gelato she serves, to the hormone-free, grass-fed local beef in her Braised Sichuan Beef, Chiuho honors that local story. Take a look at her list of friends.

The use of local foods is not only better for you and the environment, it tastes better. And like the ripple created by a pebble cast into still water, the beneficial effects of eating local food radiate outwards to:

  • Support the local economy – Money spent with local farmers stays close to home.
  • Promote Variety – You can see this on our ever-changing Chef’s Choice Tasting Menu!
  • Create Community – Knowing where your food is from connects you to the people who raise and grow it.

 

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One Response to How to spot a good Chinese Restaurant in Vermont (of all places)

  1. It would be good if they had at least 1 or 2 staff that speaks English so they can entertain foreigners.